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Hi Everyone! I am feeling every feeling in the book. Right n

[2180]

Hi Everyone! I am feeling every feeling in the book. Right now I'm excited! I am going to a workshop on "Invisible Disabilities." Like chronic pain, for example. You can't see it so most people don't understand what all the fuss is about. I am struggling to let myself feel anger when it goes on and on without reprieve. But I need to remember to maintain a balance between that and acceptance. I think this workshop will help with that. Check in with you later. Whahoo!

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Jennipain's picture
[488520]
Feb 10

Wow please keep us informed on all of this sounds very interesting to me.

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[2180]
Feb 12

@Jennipain Hey Jennipain... It was... I'm trying to come up with a word but a phrase comes to mind. It knocked my sox off! It was put on by an Anglican church, who practices inclusiveness already but is looking for ways to treat people with invisible disabilities with sensitivity and respect. Hooray for them! Some of the invisible disabilities are mental illness; addictions; learning disabilities like dyslexia and ADD/ ADHD... just to name a few. There are many more. There was a documentary called, Who Am I To Stop It by Cheryl Green and Cynthia Lopez. Cheryl Green was the facilitator. She has brain damage that manifests as exaggerated startle response. When you talk to her you must wait if her back is to you. Tapping her on the shoulder? You'd have to peel her off the ceiling, we were told. She's highly distractable; too much noise interferes with her concentration. So we were told to rub our hands together instead of clapping our applause. How amazing is that?! Especially since the documentary was about three people with brain injury who use art to reconnect to a sense of identity, pride and community. It was a hard film to watch because it wasn't an inspirational, upbeat piece. It shows these people in their rawness after rehabilitation. Their broken dreams like playing professional basketball; graduating from college; buying a house, to name a few. How these people fall through the cracks dealing with not only with a disability but abject poverty. I was stunned. Literally. I am facing poverty because with my scoliosis and anxiety I can't work. At least not at this point. It adds to my struggle and sometimes I feel outright terror. And then I realize that I can't indulge in that because I will have an anxiety attack and that's a whole other fear. So this film was timely.

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