The following "copy and paste" is one section from a link a

kisobel's picture
[184105]

The following "copy and paste" is one section from a link a member recommended. I have only thought about how much music affects me in recent years and have found my mood can change profoundly as a result. What sort of music do you listen to? Does the music help you to feel calm and balanced?
Healthy Choices in Music Lead to Greater Stability

Music is a powerful force on our emotions and mood. It can lift our mood, excite our mind, and propel us to action. It can also inspire us or depress us. Listening to music directly affects the dopamine levels in our brains. Cocaine provides a “high” by means of dramatically increasing the dopamine level in the brain. Listening to music can’t give you the same kind of “high” that a drug like cocaine can, however it can affect the emotional and physical components in our brain chemistries.

Music is used for therapy for those with bipolar disorder on a professional level. It can also be used as a self-help therapy.

Two things need to be considered when listening to music as a way to promote peace and tranquility.

1. The amount of time we spend listening to music, and

2. The type and intensity of the music we listen to

Because bipolar disorder is a mood disorder, and music affects moods, if we are struggling with a mood imbalance, too high or too low, to the point that psychiatric intervention is needed, we need to carefully consider the amount of time we spend listening to music. For some teens, one hour to 12 hours a day listening to music is not uncommon.

Listening to too much popular music is linked to a higher rate of clinical depression in teenagers. This may be the case for some adults, as well. In addition, taking anti-depressants can lead to manic-like symptoms for some, and can even be a contributing factor towards an eventual bipolar diagnosis, especially if core issues are not addressed during the interim.

For those with bipolar disorder, or with symptoms of bipolar disorder, music should be enjoyed moderately, in measured doses. Avoid overindulging in music. Even classical music can have a profound affect on your moods.

It was more difficult to overindulge in music during prior centuries. In fact, David Byrne (of the Talking Heads) notes that music has never been as accessible as it now. In the past you had to play an instrument, listen to a family member play, or attend an event to listen to music. Today, music is available literally 24-hours a day in various formats. The mind simply was not meant to assimilate so much mood-affecting information, with, what is often, highly emotional music playing in our brains on such a continuous basis. Moderation and self-regulation are necessary.

The type of music we regularly listen to also is an important element to consider. Music can be joyful or angry, happy or hateful. It does affect both our emotions and our ways of thinking. Choose music that is positive; be careful not to over-stimulate your brain with too much high-intensity music. Perhaps tone down the type of music you listen to one of a less-intense level. Listen to different genres of music, some with a more-relaxed pace. Give your mind long intervals to rest—days of silence, rather than constant stimulation.

Healthy choices in music is one of the keys to greater stability, and a greater balance in moods can be achieved for many with bipolar disorder by giving attention to this modifiable aspect of life. While this is especially true for children and teenagers, it is also true for many adults.

In another slant on music, learning to play a musical instrument strengthens your mind, and helps you to build self-esteem. It fills vacant or passive hours with a positive activity. Playing a musical instrument may be linked to positive emotional-social well-being.

The following "copy and paste" is one section from a link a member recommended. I have thought about how much music affects me in recent years and have found my mood can change profoundly as a result. What sort of music do you listen to? Does the music help you to feel calm and balanced?
Healthy Choices in Music Lead to Greater Stability

Music is a powerful force on our emotions and mood. It can lift our mood, excite our mind, and propel us to action. It can also inspire us or depress us. Listening to music directly affects the dopamine levels in our brains. Cocaine provides a “high” by means of dramatically increasing the dopamine level in the brain. Listening to music can’t give you the same kind of “high” that a drug like cocaine can, however it can affect the emotional and physical components in our brain chemistries.

Music is used for therapy for those with bipolar disorder on a professional level. It can also be used as a self-help therapy.

Two things need to be considered when listening to music as a way to promote peace and tranquility.

1. The amount of time we spend listening to music, and

2. The type and intensity of the music we listen to

Because bipolar disorder is a mood disorder, and music affects moods, if we are struggling with a mood imbalance, too high or too low, to the point that psychiatric intervention is needed, we need to carefully consider the amount of time we spend listening to music. For some teens, one hour to 12 hours a day listening to music is not uncommon.

Listening to too much popular music is linked to a higher rate of clinical depression in teenagers. This may be the case for some adults, as well. In addition, taking anti-depressants can lead to manic-like symptoms for some, and can even be a contributing factor towards an eventual bipolar diagnosis, especially if core issues are not addressed during the interim.

For those with bipolar disorder, or with symptoms of bipolar disorder, music should be enjoyed moderately, in measured doses. Avoid overindulging in music. Even classical music can have a profound affect on your moods.

It was more difficult to overindulge in music during prior centuries. In fact, David Byrne (of the Talking Heads) notes that music has never been as accessible as it now. In the past you had to play an instrument, listen to a family member play, or attend an event to listen to music. Today, music is available literally 24-hours a day in various formats. The mind simply was not meant to assimilate so much mood-affecting information, with, what is often, highly emotional music playing in our brains on such a continuous basis. Moderation and self-regulation are necessary.

The type of music we regularly listen to also is an important element to consider. Music can be joyful or angry, happy or hateful. It does affect both our emotions and our ways of thinking. Choose music that is positive; be careful not to over-stimulate your brain with too much high-intensity music. Perhaps tone down the type of music you listen to one of a less-intense level. Listen to different genres of music, some with a more-relaxed pace. Give your mind long intervals to rest—days of silence, rather than constant stimulation.

Healthy choices in music is one of the keys to greater stability, and a greater balance in moods can be achieved for many with bipolar disorder by giving attention to this modifiable aspect of life. While this is especially true for children and teenagers, it is also true for many adults.

In another slant on music, learning to play a musical instrument strengthens your mind, and helps you to build self-esteem. It fills vacant or passive hours with a positive activity. Playing a musical instrument may be linked to positive emotional-social well-being.

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rdpca1's picture
[51425]
Dec 7

@kisobel
Live concert music helps the most when depressed something about watching musicians play and listening and crowd energy distracts s lot from negative thoughts. Latest favorite first song and Youth song starts at 1:03 if fast forward :) Glass Animals (good description for bipolar?)
https://youtu.be/RP8_2RdA-nc

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norseduncan's picture
[111065]
Dec 7

@kisobel im a much better rhythm guitarist than lead, but I've been working on my leads as well. my lead work is very bluesy

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[24425]
Dec 7

@kisobel I'm happy to hear I'm not the only one! Yes, it's the music that reminds me of things and times... and that's basically all rocking good music. I love Deep House. :) I like Jungle sometimes too. Even more acoustic electronica is ok, but lyrical words with passionate music, not good for me. :) nice to know someone understands. :)

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