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Dealt with wife bi-polar for 15 years. She has alienated h

[45]

Dealt with wife bi-polar for 15 years. She has alienated her friends and family and just about all of mine. She refuses to stay on regular meds and therapy. Marriage professionals say no amount of help will work until she is in a stable state of mind. any suggestions and is this statement true? Our 13 year old son doesn't want to come home half the time around her. Are we better off on our own, I think she has already ruined his attitude on life.

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[45]
May 18

@cfmoore1 woman

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[76770]
May 18

@cfmoore1
Now at age 63 and reflecting on a life lived as bipolar, there comes a point in life when you have to be responsible and realize that it's not going to go away. If we are not responsible, bad things can happen. Isolation is a two way street. Most of my family refuses to include me due to the stigma associated with bipolar. I can't change ignorance. Bipolar is greatly due to chemicals and the fact that they are not secreting correctly. So much of the world takes drugs to elevate their mood and I can do that naturally, instead, I take meds so my mood doesn't elevate.

I'm sure your marriage is a challenge, most marriages are. Your wife needs to understand that she has a mental disorder that is treatable but she has to be responsible about it and take her meds as prescribed, eat correctly and get adequate sleep. If she is not going to be responsible to herself then essentially, you are off the hook. If she can't remember to take her meds, she has a lot more going on than bipolar.

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newcomer94's picture
[9950]
May 19

@cfmoore1 I'm sorry to hear about this, especially because of your 13 year old son. Remember that children have an easier time adapting to things because their minds are still in the process of changing constantly. He will come out of his funk with your support and the support of family and friends. It is important that he understands his mom is simple not well. As far as being on your own and cutting her off...Perhaps limiting your contact between her and your son would be wise while she's still in the midst of it all. The truth is that while she's in that state she won't be able to help herself or anyone else.

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